April Reading Allowed Newsletter

 

100 and growing…..it’s official
 

Reading Allowed is officially working with more than 100 students and are growing fast. We’re looking forward to sharing our plans for summer and fall. Reading Allowed will be busy in camps and schools and we couldn’t be more excited!

 

Introducing Katie McShane – Program Manager

 
As you know, our mission is to provide high quality, structured literacy tutoring to every student. As we continue to grow, we are committed to staying true to our mission of maintaining the excellence of our instruction. To this end, we could not be more happy to announce that we have hired Katie McShane as our Program Manager.
 
Katie is passionate about staying on the cutting edge of the science of reading and sharing her knowledge with others. She has been working with Reading Allowed students for over a year now and she loves nothing more than working with our students and tutors to make sure that every student gets the very best reading tutoring they so deserve. Welcome Katie!
 

Reading Allowed Parent/Caregiver Association

 
Research has shown that partnerships between parents, educators and children enhance children’s success. Children learn more when everyone in a learning community works together to share thoughts and information and work on projects to benefit children. With your support and involvement, Reading Allowed will be able to offer, through programming and special events, wonderful opportunities for your students to engage with other students. And you, too, will have the opportunity to connect and communicate with other parents and caregivers of struggling readers. 
 
Please contact me, Angela@ReadingAllowed.org if you are interested in helping to make Reading Allowed a Reading Community. With the support and input of a Reading Allowed Parent/Caregiver Association, we can share our vision for Reading Allowed and the students we serve, and achieve it together. 
 

Facebook Birthday Fundraising Page

 
What better way to celebrate a special occasion than creating a Facebook fundraising event for Reading Allowed. We are so grateful to all have done this so far and to everyone who has donated. Please let us know if you need help setting it up.
 

Family Resource Center

April is Poetry Month!

 
Here are 6 reasons why your kids NEED poetry.
 
  1. Poetry helps build early literacy skills. It really does! Rhyme, rhythm, and sound are emphasized in poems. 
  2. Poetry helps kids develop their memory and brain power — nursery rhymes and songs, especially! 
  3. Poetry encourages kids to play with language and words. When kids read poetry, they hear how words can be moved and stretched to rhyme.
  4. Poetry helps emerging readers. Often, emerging readers are not as intimidated when reading poetry because many poems are short, and the rhyme and rhythm helps with figuring out words.
  5. If nursery rhymes too “babyish,” try using rap to teach poetry. Poetry, especially in songs and rap (check for parental advisory), is great for reluctant readers. When kids realize that songs and rap are forms of poetry, they become interested.
  6. Poetry gives kids an outlet for sharing their thoughts, ideas, and feelings — especially tweens and teens.
Fun Poetry Books to Share with your Kids
 
  • A light in the attic by Shel Silverstein (or any book by this author!)
  • The new kid on the block: Poems by Jack Prelutsky (or any book by this author!)
  • Hip hop speaks to children: a celebration of poetry with a beat by Nikki Giovanni
  • Lemonade and Other Poems Squeezed from a Single Word by Bob Raczka 
  • Thinker: my puppy poet and me by Greenfield, Eloise
  • Poem-mobiles: Crazy car poems by J. Patrick Lewis
  • Change Sings: A Children’s Anthem by Amanda Gorman (look for this book after September 21, 2021!)
 
Books that celebrate World Autism Awareness Month 
 
All my stripes: A Story for Children with Autism by Shaina Rudolph
Zane rushes home to tell his mother about problems he faced during his school day, and she reminds him that while others may only see his “autism stripe,” he has stripes for honesty, caring, and much more.
The boy with big, big feelings by Britney Winn Lee
Meet a boy with feelings so big that they glow from his cheeks, spill out of his eyes, and jump up and down on his chest. Worried about rejection, he tries to hide his feelings from the other kids at school. When he meets a girl with big feelings too, he discovers that having big emotions is nothing to be ashamed of.
The girl who thought in pictures: The story of Dr. Temple Grandin by Julia Mosca  
A brief rhyming account of the childhood and work of Temple Grandin, an animal scientist who lives with high-functioning autism.
 
 

More Newsletters

May Reading Allowed Newsletter

Reading Allowed In The News!    Wilson Language recently featured Reading Allowed in their newsletter. Read how we began and our mission to foster literacy

Reading Allowed Featured in WHYY

Half a million Pa. kids are supposed to be learning to read right now. Are they?ByAvi Wolfman-ArentOctober 5, 2020 Small gaps now — big gaps

June Book Club Announcement

Reading Allowed believes that every struggling reader deserves the highest quality structured literacy instruction regardless of financial circumstances. Instruction is delivered by caring and compassionate

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